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Francine Honey

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April 18, 2019 at 9:11 am - Home, Canadian Coast to Coast
By Cal Gratton

Canadian Coast To Coast is presented by The Eagle River Casino and Travel Plaza in Whitecourt.

My Special Guest is Francine Honey.

Hard-luck stories can have happy endings. Especially in Francine Honey’s world. “Some of these songs are about going through tough times and then getting to the other side,” the Ontario singer-songwriter says of her third record ‘To Be Continued…’. “I know I’ve certainly been through my share of struggles. But it’s important to have hope and know you’re not alone. If you’re going through something, someone else has gone through it too. And you have to remember: You don’t know what’s around the corner. Your ‘to be continued…’ might be beyond what you ever imagined.”

‘To Be Continued…’ is an album that showcases Honey’s most striking and stirring compositions. “I’m so happy,” she says. “I’m really proud of this record and how it all came together.” Cut in Nashville with Grammy-nominated producer Neilson Hubbard (John Prine, Mary Gauthier, Jason Isbell) and first-call players like guitarists Will Kimbrough and Kris Donegan, pianist Dan Mitchell, bassist Dean Marold and legendary fiddler Eamon McLoughlin, To Be Continued… takes Honey’s mix of Americana, Country, Rock, Canadiana and Blues to the next level, capturing the sound she’s been chasing for years. “It’s hard to articulate what you hear in your head and get it to come to life through other musicians,” she says. But after getting Hubbard’s name from singer-songwriter Gretchen Peters, she knew she’d found her man. “I looked up the songs he produced and went, ‘That’s what I’ve been hearing!’

Now, ‘To Be Continued’ takes Francine’s listeners on a journey. Courageously drawing from her own life, Honey’s latest songs run the gamut of emotion. Snowflakes on My Eyelashes channels the grief of loss; Can’t Break Through to You examines PTSD; and the moving Marilyn documents a harrowing health scare. “That’s a very tough subject and a very personal song,” she confesses. “The room goes quiet when I play it. But I’ll see someone wipe a tear from their eye, and know that song has touched someone.” It’s not alone: Stay was a semi-finalist in the Canada Songwriting Contest and Mamas Take Bad Dreams Away made the top five in the Canada South Songwriting Contest.

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